Two or three things we haven’t talked about NFT and trust, told by Alice and a wise 🐇.

I have been hanging out in the alleys of digital art for over 20 years and finally a market seems to be rising where skepticism reigned. Maybe it’s thanks to NFT & C, but there’s something which still needs to be understood on how we are using our most precious resource: trust.

Riccardo Zanardelli

--

“DREAMING OF ELECTRIC UNICORNS”, pixels on the screen (2021).

The very nature of digital objects — duplicable and ubiquitous like no physical objects can be— has always left the world of art skeptical: who would ever invest their money in a work of art without scarcity?

With NFTs, the puzzle seems to have found a solution. Will it last? Probably yes, as long as galleries, artists and buyers will understand the foundations of this technology. In this moment of collective euphoria, with NFT and blockchain mixed like mint and water in a popsicle, it’s important not to get confused: an NFT can exist even without a decentralized ledger. Strange, but true. Obviously this requires trusting some form of authority (for example a trusted time stamp authority), becuase no God has ever denied or prohibited us to trust a third party.

Is the rabbit wise?

So, what does exaclty the blockchain have to do with it? And then, how does the consensus and trust model that drives the whole process work? It would be nice to discuss this with some good experts, but maybe we can first of all raise some doubts. What I propose to you is to start from a question: what are we exactly trusting?

This is a topic that has many shades of grey. To address it, I decided to use a story. This story is a particular and extreme case, which looks for dust in the corners of the room and under the carpet. So let’s leave the stage to the protagonists of this story and unroll the events related to ALICE and his digital work X (a unique piece, for sale, but which makes…

--

--

Riccardo Zanardelli

Digital Platforms @ Beretta | PhD student in Statistics & Data Science @ AEM, UNIBS | Engineer | Only personal opinions here | Code is Law (cit.)